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wilson-cohen teaches women how to shoot. and the idea of an assault weapons ban worries her. >> i'm very concerned and i think we are teetering on losing our rights. >> reporter: she says about 90% of her female clients buy guns to boost their confidence levels and for self-protection. >> we have females that are out there saying "we need to ban guns," but we don't really have somebody at the table that represents women saying why we do need them. >> reporter: one of her students, jennifer wisner, struggled for months before she made the decision to buy a gun. >> to have people put limitations on what you can do after you've given it so much thought, it's kind of sad. >> reporter: she purchased a smith & wesson pistol two months ago. >> as a woman you're not expected to own a gun. you know, for me, you give it some thought. you know, can you shoot the gun? do you want to shoot the gun? if you had to, could you? you really think about it before you ever go and do it. >> reporter: in the wake of the newtown shooting, both women say they support the call for universal background checks for
kerry's seat has been moved on since he moved on to secretary of state. william mo cohen. cohen will be on the job until a special election in june. it's the first time in history there will be two african-americans serving in the senate. the other is tim scott of south carolina. >>> and congress is expected to hold another so-called bipartisan date night when the president delivers the state of the union address next month. for the third-straight year dozens of lawmakers plan to break tradition by sitting with members of the opposing party. it's all to symbolize the importance of working together. >> i'm sure that's not awkward at all. >>> all right. coming up after the break, the man behind the manti te'o hoax. he comes clean in a very big way. >> yes. >>> plus, the developing story about the power of computer hackers. a major newspaper battles a major cyber threat. >>> and wrong place, wrong time. created quite a wild ride. >>> welcome back, everybody. the dow jones industrial average still has not hit that coveted 14,000 mark. in fact, it actually lost ground yesterday, than
interviewing african-americans who grew up in what theologian james cohen callsed chate the shadow of the lynching tree. they lived in fear of one. or in the case of 92-year-old willie matthew thomas, narrowly escaped being lynched. >> so one of them said, look, we going to hang him or not? and they said, sure we're going to hang him. so he made up the noose, and they put it round my neck. and i -- i remembered in the bible it speak about how they treated jesus, and they said, "they led him away to be crucified." they led me away to be crucified, to be hung. >> thomas was saved when a white man, who knew his family, showed up with a shotgun and intervened. dr. sims got the idea for her project when she heard a speech about lynching by retired minister the reverend wallace hartsfield, sr. now 83, he was only eight or nine living in georgia when he peered from behind a curtain and saw a mob. >> they had taken the man out, and they had used his body for gun practice, and then they had hanged him, and then cut him down and dragged him through the street and this was supposed to be a wa
gridlock steve cohen of memphis introduced a bill this week which would require states to use independent redistricting commissions in drawing those maps. here we in to talk about his bill and what he expects during president obama's second term, is congressman steve cohen. welcome to "the war room"." >> thank you good to be with you. >> michael: do you think they would or could pass this bill. >> whether they would is doubtful but it's an important bill because we have gridlock and the reason for that is too many districts are concerned about the primary and the far right and far left and they don't have to work with the whole community or the center, because of the partisan redistricting which we have in most states are drawn up just to suit their people or make them overwhelmingly ohio. ohio went for the president. ohio went to sherrod brown but yet 12 of the 16 districts drawn up by the ohio legislature were republican. that's not right. it does not reflect the will of the people. it reflects the lines they've drawn. it makes it that those the republicans don't have to work with the c
, then alys cohen, staff attorney for the national consumer law center. and then if i move all the way to my right-hand side, susan walker, who's professor -- susan wanter in from the university of pennsylvania, david moskowitz and karen thomas, senior executive vice president for government relations at the independent community bankers association of america. thank you all for being here, and perhaps we might start with you, mr. calhoun. >> thank you. today the cfpb announces one of its most important rules, the qualified mortgage ability to repay rule, along with the upcoming mortgage servicing rules that will come out next week that address failures in the mortgage market that devastated millions of families and our overall economy. the twin drivers of this were widespread, unaffordable loans and a broken mortgage servicing system that severely aggravated the ensuing wave of foreclosures. the goal of the dodd-frank legislation and the rule today are to redirect incentives so that lenders are encouraged to make loans that are long-term sustainable, not just generators of short-term fees.
. pros and cons of being slightly overweight. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spells them out next. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their buddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> this story is for me and probably everybody watching. if you packed on a couple of extra pounds over the holidays, excuse me, you might not have to worry so much about it. according to a new study, being a little overweight might help you live longer. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. i'm going to live to be 150 then. >> oh, please. you're one of the most fit people i know. >> it sounds counterintuitive. help us understand this. we can ditch our diet. >> we have been preached at all thes
after you see how many calories are packed into some popular restaurants. elizabeth cohen is live in atlanta. how many calories are we talking about? >> an enormous amount. in one dish, you're getting calories should you get in an entire day. i think americans expect fast food is high caloried. i think you don't get that even in a nice restaurant, sometimes you're getting even more calories. take a look at two dishes. this one right here is cheesecake factory he's bistro shrimp pasta. 3120 calories. >> did you say 3,000? >> yes. that's a 3. yes, you heard that right. and you're supposed to get about 2200 calories a day. so it's way more than you're supposed to have in an entire day. as a matter of fact, that one dish is the equivalent calorie-wise of 5 1/2 big macs. you would never sit down and eat 5 1/2 big macs, but that's what's in this dish. and let me show you another one. this is called veal porter house and crispy red potatoes and that has 2710 calories. again, more than you're supposed to have in an entire day. it is the equivalent of three pints of ben and juerry's ice cr
. sanjay gupta is in atlanta. what are you expecting to hear? >> elizabeth cohen has been working through the night on getting these numbers. one number, which is important and what we expected. widespread outbreak of the flu. 47 states, up from 41 states with an outbreak of the flu. some good news. the number of states with high levels of activity has gone down from 29 now to 24. two additional deaths in young people, from 18 to 20. but there may be some relief as you say in sight. we are at epidemic threshold. that basically means we are seeing more cases than we expected to see at this time year. big question? will those cases stay elevated or will they start to come down across the country? >> we keep hearing, get a flu shot, get a flu shot. some got our flu shots early. yes, i'm gloating. if you haven't gotten your flu shot yet, is there enough vaccine? >> i think so. i crunched some numbers on this overnight. may be some spot shortages, but general numbers, take aook at how many of these vaccines were specifically manufactured, 135 million, bottom number, 112 million vaccinated. not
cohen played -- mickey cohen played by sean penn. it's a little bit quirky. penn is definitely channeling the robert deniro element from "the untouchable." it's a fun movie. but they waste the talent of emma stone. she is so one dimensional in the film. not her fault, it's the writing. go see a matinee, don't pay the full price. three and a half out of five. worth seeing in theaters. >> your thoughts quickly on the oscar nominations, you mentioned katherine bigelow not being nominated for director. >> right. >> what's the guy's name from argo? >> ben >> ben affleck. >> do they have to broaden the director nominees as well? >> that's my point. i think that if they're going to nominate nine movies, you can not giver argo a best picture nomination and not nominate the guy who created it. that's ridiculous for me. i think these are the worst nominees i've seen in a long time. i was happy with the "django unchained," but you cannot snub bigelow, leonardo dicaprio never been awarded. an actor from a james bond film never nominated and should be nominated. he was incredible. i was ups
details the war between mobster mickey cohen and and the police officers who tried to shut down his operations. >> kevin mccarthy talked with emma stone about her role in the new thriller and how she got into the right mindset to wear some glamorous 1940s fashions. >> i think this is the most epic time period of all time. the outfits and make-up and everything. all the caches you maid in your career, which one would have the most fun in this time period being able to dress the way you dressed and talk the way you talked. >> i don't know that anyone i played thus far would be that excited to get dressed up like that. >> even the girl from easy a. >> i don't know i think she would make fun of it. >> the script only lends so much to what he with see on screen. we don't know the path you took and how you got in with mickey. do you create that in your head. do you come up with ideas of what you might have done to get where you were before the script starts? >> yeah, absolutely. it is hard to -- there are few queens so there needs to be kind of more at least for me to know what is driving
on the real police officers who tried to bring down mobster mickey cohen in the late 1940s. movie reviewer kevin mccarthy talked with ryan guessling who says the character plays was a real-life hero. >> your character initially turns down the invitation to be in the gangster squad. it could become perm and you say i'm going to do this and you join the squad. over the years in your year, is there a role that you initially turned down and you went back stand took it again. >> first of all, important to note -- the man i play is based on the relate man. the man himself real cooler. for african-american dattic purposes, the real jerry routers needed no convincing. >> right n in terms of character -- >> right. in terms of characters i turned down i did a film called blue valentine. i didn't think i could do it because i was too young to do it. >> i think the new sequence is you be believable. as an actor, where is that balance of reshooting something for artistic value and keeping the story intact and doing it because you have to do it for offensive sub matter. >> it is a hard question to answe
james brolinen plays a police sergeant who leads a group determined to bring down mickey cohen. >> after the aurora movie theater shootings last summer, the director scrapped a scene that depicted a shooting spree inside a theater. movie reviewer kevin mccarthy talked to josh brolin about the decision and how the cast reacted to shooting a new scene to replace it. >> you have to go back and actually reshoot a sequence, where is an actor of keeping the art form and story or having to do something because it is offensive. >> the decision comes from warner brothers. i think it was a very smart decision that they made because, you know, not even to bring so much attention. i don't like the idea of bringing more attention to what the guy did because of creating this iconic character whether it be columbine and ending up to time magazine and all that and doing that with this guy but also the similarities were so creepy, it was so kind of -- i've never quite seen anything like it that you just couldn't do it. i supported the decision fully and i like the new scene better. >> i love the line abo
is lisa rice, of the national housing alliance. then elise cohen at the national law center. if i move to my right hand side, susan, a professor of real estate and finance at university of spilt -- pennsylvania. david moss of its of wells fargo, and karen thomas, senior vice president for relations at the independent community bankers association of america. we might start with you, mr. calhoun. >> thank you. today, the cfpb announces one of its most important roles -- he qualified mortgage ability to repay rule and the upcoming mortgage servicing rules that will come out next week. they addressed failures in the mortgage market that devastated millions of families in our overall economy. the twin drivers of this were widespread on affordable loans and a broken mortgage servicing system that severely aggravated the ensuing wave of foreclosures. the goal of the dodd-frank legislation and the rule today are to create direct incentives so that lenders are encouraged to make loans that are long term sustainable, not just generators of short-term fees, and to also deter and prohibit abusive
life. >> reporter: elizabeth cohen, cnn, ft. worth, texas. >> thanks for watching, everyone. "cnn newsroom" continues now with martin savidge. you can pick it up from here. >> thanks very much. >> sure. >>> 12:00 p.m. on the east coast, 9:00 a.m. on the west coast. i'm martin savidge in for fredricka whitfield. if you are just tuning in, thank you very much for joining us. these are the top stories we're following right now in the "cnn newsroom." it could be one of the most shocking admissions in sports history. "usa today" is reporting that lance armstrong will admit to doping in an upcoming interview with oprah. we're following that story. >> i said it for seven years. i've said it for longer than seven years. i have never doped. i can say it again. but i've said it for seven years. it doesn't help. >> reporter: help may be something lance armstrong will need a lot of to redeem his reputation after "usa today" reports armstrong will admit to doping throughout his career. the newspaper does not name their source but says it's a person with knowledge of the situation. "usa today"
, vice president of the national fair housing alliance. then alys cohen, staff attorney for the national consumer law center. and then if i move all the way to my right inside, susan wachter who is a professor for state and finance at wharton school at the university of pennsylvania. david moskowitz is deputy general counsel at wells fargo, and karen thomas, senior executive vice president of government relations at the independent community bankers association of america. thank you all for being here. and perhaps we might start with you, mr. calhoun. >> thank you. today, the cfpb announces one of its most important rules, a qualified mortgage ability-to-repay rule, along with the upcoming mortgage servicing rules that will come out next week, address failures in the mortgage market, the devastated -- a devastating millions of families and our overall economic. twin drivers of this were widespread, unaffordable loans, and a broken mortgage servicing system that severely aggravated the ensuing wave of foreclosures. the goal of the dodd-frank legislation, the rule today, our to redirect in
house is looking at those kinds of things, labor law. larry cohen was talking about some of this earlier, the ed show. i am hopeful the white house sees a path to move the country forward. >> do you think immigration and gun reform, which the president has put forward as it first. for the first term that they can move in the senate? >> i think immigration can move in the senate. a number of things we can get in the senate because we have a way of getting over the 60 votes or speeding up the process. the house still doesn't move on it, so perhaps immigration gets through this. if it doesn't get through the house, the president will use executive powers that he has. it isn't ever as good invoking the executive powers, executive orders and other things. it will be pretty hard. there will be a lot of public pressure, as the president pushes us. i think they will use the next four years, use the bully pulpit. the republicans are going to say he is out campaigning. i think he is pushing his agenda. he needs to go over the heads of republicans to do it. i am pretty optimistic this will be a pre
. >> reporter: real life mobster mickey cohen. >> kind of like a new experience. never worked with guns or any of that stuff. >> reporter: he was reunited with his emma stone, they starred together in the comedy crazy stupid love a year and a half ago. >> last time we got to make it to the last scene the entire time. this time we didn't get to do that. >> reporter: stone says the hardest part of the role was getting into her outfit. >> it was great you know. it was like you can't really complain about wearing beautiful gowns that have been hand crafted. >> reporter: josh brolin says ryan gosling was his secret weapon. >> it's always nice to be next to a good looking guy you know. you can make a bunch of mistakes and it won't matter. >> if whole reason he killed donny -- >> he and his squad of misfit cops are now aiming to make a killing. at the box office. bigad shaban, cbs news, los angeles. >>> well, we all think that -- "argo" ben affleck director got a bit snubbed. >> but he did win a critic's choice awards last night. another one? >> richard parker life of pi you know who that character i
for the light, which comes from leonard cohen's wonderful piece "anthem." it talks about in every door there's a crack of light. from this dark loss we can look into the light and find the future. >> reporter: and for one artist, this debate is not for or against. >> i was brought up using guns. >> reporter: brian petro comes from a family of hunters in central pennsylvania. >> i think we need to think about what is the proper use and improper use. >> reporter: american art has often been vocal and radical, and krauss says "a call to arms" is supposed to be openly political, to motivate public opinion, stir the debate, a constitutional conversation arguing about the second amendment with the freedoms of the first. and no one gets muffled. >> some powerful pictures there. the exhibit is free. the art is for sale. most of the proceeds will go towards groups pushing for gun control. you can find the details on nbcwashington.com. all you have to do is search newtown project. >>> it is a cold weekend. so what better way to spend it than jumping into freezing cold water? two polar plunges are set
leonard cohen's wonderful piece "anthem." and it talks about in every door there's a crack of light. from this dark loss, we can look into the light and find, you know, the future. >> reporter: and for one artist, this debate is not for our against. >> i was brought up using guns. >> reporter: brian pietro comes from a family of hunters in pennsylvania. >> i think we need to think about proper use and improper use. >> reporter: american art has been often vocal and radical. and he says a call to arms is supposed to be openly political. to motivate public opinion, stir the debate, a constitutional conversation arguing about the second amendment. with the freedoms of the first. and no one gets muffled. >> this exhibit is free and the art is for sale, most of the proceeds will go towards groups that push for gun control. you can find the details on nbcwashington.com, search newtown project. let's head back outside. the snow is starting to accumulate. it's been falling for several hours now, and that's a lovely shot. we have a full moon and we have our storm team 4 chief meteorologist for you
autism lost their symptoms as they grew older. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen here to talk to me about this study. first, just explain the study. >> it is fascinating because it turns conventional wisdom on its head. doctors thought you can't outgrow autism once you're diagnosed, that's it. you have it. these researchers found 34 kids who were diagnosed with autism by good doctors who know what they're doing as very young kids before the age of 5, and then they -- years later when they looked at them, they didn't have any signs of autism. they were examined and the signs were gone. >> so how is this even possible? >> a couple of things going on. they found in some ways this group of kid had somewhat milder autism to begin with, that's one thing. it could also have something to do with the early intervention that these kids got, some of the training and the schooling and what have you, the therapy these kids got. and it also might have something to do with the children's individual brains. maybe there was something about their brains. and researchers have told me, you know,
identify whether or not they have this thing. elizabeth cohen in atlanta. why is this one so nasty this time around, elizabeth? >> soledad, it is the perfect storm for this particular stomach bug. so let's go over the three things that make this one really bad. first of all this particular strain, so new, it's called the sydney 2012. first spotted in sydney just last year, we're not immune to it. our bodies haven't seen it before. it comes on full force. highly contagious. just need one or two particles of this virus to get you sick. and a lot of people get this illness, they are contagious, but symptom free. they are not sick. running around making the rest of us sick. >> so disgusting. you know how i feel about those people. elizabeth cohen, thank you. listen, she and i agree on the purell thing. >>> the southeast getting a dose of the deep freeze with snow, freezing rain and dangerous ice expected from the carolinas to tennessee. even farther south. drivers in nashville, told don't travel if you don't have to. out west, the rare sight of freezing rain forced the runways at salt
of beverly hills talked about staking her dog jiggy to andy cohen's show "watch what happens live." >> jiggy was slurping from -- ice cube from a vodka tonic. >> andy cohen is a bad influence. >> jiggy was so jilled, he would fall asleep. >> he looks little hung over. >> jiggy is more of a social drinker whereas cleo drank for medicinal purposes. sometimes the only thing that helps is a little hair of the dog. thanks for watching. that does it for us. "early start" begins now. >>> america on ice. from the midwest to mid-atlantic, subzero cold causes misery and takes more li lives. >>> the right to fight. for the first time the pentagon will allow women in combat on the front lines. >> that's huge news. >>> a defiant north korea threatening more nuclear tests and calling the u.s. its sworn enemy. that breaking overnight. good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start," i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. thursday, january 24th, 5:00 a.m. in the east. let's get started here. up first if you are still wrapped up in your blankets you may want to stay right where you are. >> do not mov
. secretary cohen is out there now. i came back with the following set of impressions from it. first of all, they are very concerned about what is going on in iraq. they understand about the problems of the weapons of mass destruction and the fact that they do threaten them. it is less visible, i think, than a cross border threat. second, they are fully convinced that this crisis has been created by saddam hussein. they are concerned about the iraqi people, as are we, which is why we support this oil for food plan that we wrote originally with the resolution and is now being proposed to be expanded by kofi annan. they also preferred diplomatic moves, but they also understand that should there be consequences, there will be responsible for the grave consequences. i feel confident of their support. they state they have domestic audiences and they state their support for their own purposes. i do feel that should we use force, they will be helpful to us. i think that they also understand the dangers. it is not quite the same situation as when saddam hussein invaded kuwait and there were six mon
of massachusetts has selected his staff william cohen to temporarily fill kerry's u.s. senate seat. >>> outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton says she does not see herself getting back into politics. during a round of exit interviews, clinton says she will focus on public service, speaking and writing but she did not rule out a run for the white house in 2016. she says this whatever her decision, she's healthy and has a lot of energy. her last day on the job is friday. she says, though, she's looking forward to sleeping in on saturday. >>> 8:52. well, this morning, there are reports that boeing knew about problems with the batteries on its dreamliner jets before the battery fires earlier this month. all nippon said they had to change batteries on the dreamliners it owns on ten separate occasions for separate problems of. the airlines said they reported the problem to boeing. all 787s around the world were grounded after a battery fores and ana flight to make an emergency landing earlier this month. >>> and boeing a better than expected fourth-quarter earnings this month. we've been keeping
cohen is a neurologist at the institute of st. luke's hospital here. welcome. >> thank you. >> we know lighting causes headaches. there are a whole range of other things but is weather one of them? >> yeah. so a lot of patients with migraines will notice headaches are worse before a storm rolls in they'll start to feel the headaches as the pressure changes. we think the bear metric pressure is the cause of the headaches. >> millions of americans have debilitating headaches. what causes migraines? >> it's a jeannette ek disorder. they're actually born with it. at some point in their life they get it. for women it's around the menstrual period. other things can bring it on including stressful life events head trauma can start the headaches. >> if you have a migraine what should you do? >> there are a lot of didn't treatments available for migraine. oftentimes patients will start with over-the-counter medications but most will need prescription medications that are specifically targeted toward the changes in the brain that happen during a migraine. >> i told yo
's leading beverage company, we can play an important role. >> very interesting. elizabeth cohen joining us now. what is the meaning of this new ad campaign. >> they haven't said a lot about obesity even though people have harangued them saying, wait a second, you're selling this product that might be contributing to obesity. they're trying to say, look, we're aware of this problem and we're doing our part. for example they point out we're selling smaller sizes of coke, 7.5 ounces instead of 12. they say we have nearly 200 lee-calorie and no-calorie products. they also say we're starting to put our calories, you can see it right here on the silver band, 140 calories so you know what you're getting. so they say that they're really trying to help people make choices. they're encouraging exercise and they really hopes this sort of quiets down some of their critics. >> we've been talking about america's obesity problems for years and years. and soda, consumption, i believe, has been going downer of the the last several years f my question is then how responsible is soda really? >> if you look a
the top of this morning by mr. cohen -- the op ed by mr. cohen. we will discuss the accuracy, historical and artistically inside, but does a masterful job in suggesting in the real world there are no right angles and no easy answers to very difficult situations. that, to me, was a great service. >> i also liked the movie. it was very entertaining, but it is a movie, and there were some things i really liked and things i did not like. i did not like, for example, the portrayal of the enhanced interrogation techniques. i did not like the fact that it made a false link between torture and intelligence successes. i also think torture does not work, and our programs work because it was not tortured. there were other things i liked about the movie. i liked the fact that it conveyed that this was a 10-year marathon parian rather than a sprint -- rather than a sprint by a president, and the agency was the focus of this effort and succeeded because of the commitment, dedication, and tenacity of its people. i like the fact that it showed the enhanced interrogation program had something to do with
to the vaccine being given out nationwide. we'll talk much more with elizabeth cohen in our next hour. >>> no charges will be filed against the driver of a parade float that collided with a freight train in texas in november. four people were killed and a dozen injured. the parade honored military veterans. investigators say the float entered the train crossing and the gate then came down. >>> so some italian americans are reportedly upset at "time" magazine's latest cover that shows governor chris christie in a mug shot-like pose and there's this headline that says "the boss." "time" magazine is owned by our parent company. even chris christie took issue with this cover. he suggested it made him look like a mafia boss. he also joke eld that it made him look like tony soprano and may have damage eld his relationship with bruce springsteen because he stole his nickname. >> i assumed it was like he's supplanting bruce springsteen. >> he's a huge springsteen fan. >> i thought that, i thought he runs the republican party, the state of jersey, i did not think mafia. >> most people -- i don
correspondent elizabeth cohen has a special airing tonight on "20/20," shocking medical mistakes. so when you hear that, i'm a little unnerved already. >> it is unnerving. the reason why we did this special is -- is i know so many people this has happened to, just personally. i said i've got to do a special that helps protect people because you don't hear about these things, right? you can't hear about them. >> no. >> interestingly enough a study has come out that looks at surgical mistakes and shows how often they happen. and these numbers, i'm glad you're sitting down because they are really pretty horrifying. >> brace myself? >> yes. they're pretty horrifying. i'm glad you're not having surgery any time soon. there's a study out of johns hopkins. they found that they looked at surgical tools being left inside patients. that happens 39 patients a week. surgical tools left inside. 39 patients a week. 20 patients a week have an operation on the wrong body part. so they were supposed to have their tonsils out and instead they did something else. >> the wrong leg or wrong eye or whatever it mig
by the communication workers of america. the cwa. good men and women of the cwa under president larry cohen. the union for the information age. you bet. find out more about their good work at cwa-union.org. it is a friday morning. we're sort of tag teaming our way through the week here. because of my voice problem. peter ogborn, dan henning phil backert, cyprian bowlding and me, bill press. >> look at it this way. you are the rgiii of the team and i'm the kurt cousins. >> bill: my voice is about as strong as rgiii's right knee. at any rate -- >> it is a little bit better than that. >> bill: keeping us up to date here, those of us who live in our nation's capital on -- you know interesting stories let's say of the time where they happen to be taking place. local news editor and washington express columnist, clinton yates writes something called the root d.c. joining us on our news line this morning. good to you have on board. thanks. >> how is it going bill? how are you? >> bill: not too bad. >> if bill is the rgiii and i'm kurt cousins we'll call clinton the rex grossman. >> they give you that kind of
the sasha baron cohen thing going. we'd love to hear from you. >>> mary thompson has more for us. >> shares of western digital, top performer in the s&p 500 right now. just up over 4%. it reports earnings tomorrow. today getting a bit of a lift from an addition to the portfolio of storage products for small and medium size businesses. again, this is coming off a nice run for a lot of these storage companies, since november. some optimism on earnings as well. the rival sea gate technology reporting strong sales. a positive forecast when it reported earlier this month. back to you guys. >> thanks a lot, mary. the when we come back, the coo of las vegas sands on the state of gaming and the bets his company is making overseas. we're back in a minute. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] time and sales data. split-second stats. [ indistinct shouting ] ♪ it's so close to the options floor... [ indistinct shouting, bell dinging ] ...you'll bust your brain box. ♪ all on thinkorswim from td ameritrade. ♪ >>> good morning. welcome back to los angeles to the wor
. wolf. >> elizabeth cohen with that report, thank you. >>> we can guarantee a harbaugh will coach the winning team in the super bowl. one of the best stories in the super bowl, even if the two coaches don't want to talk about it we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in tot
were talking about a little earlier this week. i want to get right to elizabeth cohen, our medical correspondent. what exactly is deer antler spray? why would that be beneficial to someone and why is that doping? >> right. the people who make this stuff say that it comes from what they call the velvet of deer antlers. they scrape this so-called velvet off and they say that the velvet contains igf1. and igf1 is the real deal. they give it to children who have medical conditions ajd are very short to help them grow. and the makers of these sprays, and there's a lot of them out there. the makers of these sprays say that it enhances muscle growth. they say that it can make you stronger. however, the experts that we talked to said the potential dangers are that it can also increase the chances of having muscle pain and even getting diabetes and heart disease. >> is there some indication that deer antlers grow so fast or there's some quick regeneration? why would you use deer antlers versus something else? >> right, that's a great question. that's the reasoning that these products give.
of weeks. >> elizabeth cohen, thank you for that. appreciate it. >> thank you for bringing my home medical history on tv it was great. >> well, you shared it. it was really nasty too, folks. >> it was bad enough the first time. now we share it with america. >>> top trends on cnn.com. a murder mystery that turned washington, d.c. upside down. 2001. it was nuts. i was there. a brand new development in the chandra levy murder case. defense attorneys want a retrial. prosecutors withheld important information about a witness. we don't know which witness was involved, but defense attorneys say the government already had the information during the trial. 30-year-old ingmar guandice is serving a 60-year sentence after being convicted of murder. >>> crocodiles on the loose? are we going to see them. it's in south africa. some 1,500 crocodiles escaped from a reptile farm after it was flooded. half have been recaptured. one was located 75 miles away on a high school rugby field. one of the country's largest river, and now there are apparently a lot. >> a crocodile outbreak in south africa. >>> first
, tyler cohen, i think there are others -- who sort of say we've seen the end of growth. no more growth. we've now just got to sort of settle down and deal with the fact that we're not going to have anymore growth. and i think the evidence is really strongly against that. there is in your pack, and i'm doing a little bit of a plug here, an external senior fellow here at brookings as well as director of the mckinsey global institute, and he and i are working on a project with the support of others looking at in this question what are some of the game changers, what are the ways in which we can get innovation and actually as we get out of this mess on the deficit and the recession really start to get stronger growth in the economy? and the thing that's really needed, the thing that we didn't have in the first, even the first seven years of this century was sort of innovation-driven, output-driven growth. we had a lot of restructuring productivity, but we haven't really had it for some years now real output-driven innovation and growth, and that's part of what we're looking for and part of
more than i need. >> yeah, but most vitamins -- >> i know, the excess washes away. >> right. the cohen ziems and the reaction that you need there for the reaction, but you only need the amounts that you need for it to happen. anything over and above that is superfluous. and it goes out in your pee. so i'm not saying you shouldn't be able to make money with it. in fact, there have been some people who have made a lot of money. herb greenberg has a great documentary, which i watched yesterday online. >> he's focusing on herbalife, which is perfect for him. >> he's been working on it a long time. he's dug into interviews, he's -- was the bottom line? what is the lead for herb's piece spp. >> the question becomes is it a upon zee scheme or not? he talks to the company, he talks to some of the distributors who have had complaints, say that they got drawn into it. in fact, the last quote is from a woman who says this is not what i signed up for. >> do the products help anyone? >> i didn't dig into that. that part was not brought up in these 20 minutes. >> what's the biggest products? >> i do
morning. >> steve: officer cohen, let's start with you, take us back to january 10, thursday. you guys were heading back to the cop shop and you saw something alongside the road. right? >> we were heading back from one of our elementary schools because we house of representatives at risk youth. so we were heading back to our station, we saw a dog lying on the side of the road on the sidewalk. we had a real brief discussion, you know, does he look hungry? you think he looks hung flee let's go get him some food. so we went, grabbed him some food, maybe a block away, came back, 'cause his ribs were sticking out. officer lancaster attempted to feed him. when he lifted his head up, he then cried, as if he was in pain. so we looked a little closer and we realized that his left leg was swollen and he had scratches all over him. >> steve: oh, my goodness. officer lancaster, we should point out that philly now is simply asleep. philly is on the road to recovery. so you would you know up taking -- how adorable. you call him philly because you named him after a sergeant from philly. tell us a lit
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